Skip to main content

About your Search

English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
that the u.n. commission of inquiry on syria's chemical weapons attack quote, points to the fact that evidence indicates responsibility at the highest level of government, including head of state. i know that the u.n. report did not say who was responsible. >> u.n. commissioner was talking about war crimes in general, specifically excluded the gas issue. because they had no information about it. they're not allowed, the u.n., presumably, to make a statement about who did what. they can say that there was a gas attack, but they don't want -- by commission, i guess, they're not allowed to say who did it. i don't know why. because i think there's a lot of evidence to be made available. there is sarin, it was used. the sarin that the syria army has has a different chemical component than the sarin that would be made by the front because the army is more sophisticated, has certain additives. certainly someone has looked at that. i don't know why they don't talk about the sarin they have and whether it shows it came from the army or did not. the other thing one could say is the preside
the tributes after ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general speaks, the tribute by foreign dignitaries, then the president of the united states, barack obama, followed by the leaders of brazil, china and india and then cuba. raul castro. they will all be on this little stage, this little area in front of 90,000 people who have gathered in the soccer stadium so there could be a moment where president obama and raul castro may shake hands, may talk, who knows. >> be interesting to watch if they shake hands. that was the big thing, the gore people wanted no physical contact or substantive communications because of the relationship between the two countries. obviously, you can get as close as we are at an event like that and we will see what happens. you watch something like that. for the former presidents to be together, you know this because you have been at big events, the opening of presidential libraries here at home, the king hussain funeral, you had a group like that. the pope john paul ii funeral, you had several presidents together. it's a security challenge, number one, then the
was toppled over. people taking turns taking aim. >>> and from iran tonight, state tv is reporting that u.n. inspectors have begun their work. it comes after that landmark short-term nuclear agreement. this weekend in washington, meantime, president obama giving the odds of achieving a long-term agreement with iran 50/50 at best. >>> meantime, the pentagon under fire tonight for its decision to buy combat helicopters made in russia. lawmakers on both sides, asking, why not made in america? here tonight, abc's aditi roy. >> reporter: tonight, new questions arise as to why the pentagon chose to spend more than $1 billion on dozens of russian mi-17 helicopters, to support afghan troops, bypassing u.s. manufacturers. the defense department signed the deal more than two years ago and pentagon officials defended the move, citing a 2010 top secret study, which they said recommended the russian helicopter as the top choice. but the associated press has obtained excerpts of the study, which said the u.s. manufactured chinook helicopter was the, quote, most cost effective single platform type fleet f
, and they assured him the deal would get done. >>> in iran, u.n. nuclear inspectors visited a heavy water production plant on sunday. this is the first time in more than two years inspectors have been allowed inside. two weeks ago iran agreed to curb its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. >>> and coming up on the "morning news," fan frenzy. a riot breaks out in the stands at a soccer match, sending some people to the hospital. this is the "cbs morning news." to the hospital. this is the "cbs morning news." if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further damage. doctors have been prescribing humira for over ten years. humira works by targeting and helping to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. for many adults, humira is proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage. humira can lower your
. largest gathering of heads of state outside of u.n. perhaps ever. we'll have to see how this day goes. and of course, there will be tens of thousands of people, perhaps millions of people, trying to get near the soccer stadium where this event will take place. it begins at 11:00 a.m. local time, 4:00 a.m. eastern time. either supposed to last for about four hours. we understand from the list of speakers that several of nelson mandela's grandchildren will speak, also his co-defendants convicted with mandela in 1963 and sentenced to a life in prison on robben island. one of them will speak as well as heads of state, president obama, president of brazil, china, india, raoul castro of cuba. this country has been friends and allies for some time. quite a day ahead of us, andrea. that's just one day. there will be several days where nelson mandela's body will lie in state at the union building at the national capital here and, of course, culminating event, the funeral in the eastern province. a poor rural area which was nelson mandela's homeland underscoring his very humble beginnings where
. in fact, tonight at the u.n. security council not far from where we are now, they are calling a moment of silence to remember and to honor him. he was the most incredible leader for our time, especially as we know, the possibility of violence, of division, of paralysis and partisanship, he really was able to overcome that and his long walk to freedom has benefited the whole world and how ironic it is that the film of his own biography is coming out right now. there are premieres right now, last week in the kennedy center in washington, tonight in london, where his own daughter has been, and there is so much now that is coming out for people to be able to read and to reflect and to pause and remember just what gift this amazing man gave to the world. i interviewed f.w. de clerk, who was his partner in the end and the dismantling of apartheid, one of the world's most violent racist regimes that endured for so long, a
was with them when they went to the u.n. and asked for the removal of sanctions, to be around this man who had such gravitas, but humaniility at th same time was an awesome experience. >> you were there, as the reverend was just mentioning to see that first democratic election in south africa, in which nelson mandela was elected the first democratic president of that country. >> i was there. and let me say, chris, that my heart is very heavy tonight. the people of south africa, the people of the world, we've lost a great warrior, a great leader. i also have to say, the lessons we've learned from president mandela are so, so great. and being there as an election observer is one of the moments i will always remember. because these elections were very difficult. when i landed, the first task we had was to monitor the -- and reverend al, you may remember this, the cleanup of a bomb blast that was palablasted out front of the anc headquarters. i think 30 people died. so these elections, nelson mandela did not take lightly. the people of south africa did not take lightly. but they waited in line. it
a point this violates a u.n. security treaty and empowers other countries to say we're going to strike an accord with you to allow you to continue your uranium enrichment. all that does is encourage other countries within the middle east to say we abided by this. but if you allow iran to do this, then why can't we do this? that's my concern. >> right. we didn't stop pakistan. we didn't stop north korea. so the idea that iran can be stopped if they want to make a nuclear weapon seems to not have a great historic president dent. >> you know, they have the know how. what will it take if they're going to pursue the bomb? it would take a sustained military campaign, not just a bombing campaign. a bombing campaign would set them back for a period of time. but if they were determined, it would have to be repeated bombing campaign and may include boots on the ground. because that is such an awful prospect, we need to see if there is a peaceful way to put an end to this program. that's why i think the interim deal makes sense. i share the skepticism that we can get to a final deal. >> the chanc
, the brazilian president and french president, u.n. secretary-general and more. as a way of facilitating this massive logistical challenge the government deployed some 11,000 troops to make sure as the interest builds it's on the fourth of the tenth day of mourning people are safe and there are no snags having so many vips here in the country. tomorrow's event, the tuesday memorial service which possibly could be attended by the u.s. president will be the first formal event, followed by nelson mandela's lying in-state at the union building in pretoria wednesday through friday. significant, john, because it was 20 years ago he was sworn in as president at that location. so a euphoric week for a country bidding farewell to a man they credit for bringing people together. >> errol barnett, with unshakeable concentration in johannesburg, the celeb brags going on around you, a fitting tribute to nelson mandela, thank you so much. >>> the bcs game the tightlogical go out with a bang, florida state battling auburn, auburn wrapped up a worst to first season in the sec and florida state took the a
was a big part of it. at the same time the u.n. security council passed the first resolution in 1962, so it was a long walk to sanctions, not just a long walk to freedom. what is your take on why it took so long, given the overt racism in south africa to get to that point? >> well, as i just mentioned, why did it take us so long to get a voting bill passed under linden johnson? how could we a country of 200 or 300 years allowed slavery, jim crowe slavery to have persisted for so long? i think that's just another example of it that over time finally the morality and the ill morality of racism was able to be overcome. but it is not easy and i think many feelings are still there. you can see there is still a divide in our country. we still divide up red state, blue state. we have those fighting the civil war in many ways in their own minds, whether it's northern aggression or the interruption of a way of life in the south, et cetera. so i think it's a part of the human drama that we have to fight this evil of discrimination based on either race, ethnicity, religion, preference, any of the s
. the top u.n. human rights official is linking bashar al assad to war crimes there. cnn's fred pleitgen has more. >> reporter: they are saying there's evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity by the syrian regime and that responsibility goes all the way up to the office of president assad. the syrian government reacted saying they give no credibility whatsoever to what the u.n. is saying and that the human rights chief has talked, quote, nonsense in the poast. they say that rebels have committed war crimes as well. kate? >> fred, thank you for that. >>> a public health alert in hong kong this morning. the first human case of a new type of bird flu is being reported there after it killed dozens in neighboring china. pauline chao has the story. >> reporter: here in hong kong, authorities are on high alert after confirming the first human case of h7f9 case. she recently slaughtered and ate a chicken in the mainland chinese city of shengxen. human infections of the this strain of bird flu emerged in shanghai this year. back to you, kate. >> it's a killing that shocked britain and the
and the current prime minister after accusations of corruption and abuse of power. the u.n. has closed its offices in bangkok warning foreign travellers to stay out of the streets. >> afghanistan president karzai is accusing the u.s. of holding back fuel and other supplies. he said they are holding back supplies in an attempt to pressure for him to sign the agreement. >> from the "los angeles times" officials say speed may have been a factor in the crash that killed actor paul walker and his friend over the weekend. according to police the "fast and furious" star left a charity event. witnesses at the event said they heard a loud boom and saw smoke. walker was in the middle of gaming "fast and furious 7." walker leaves behind a 15-year-old daughter. he was 40 years old. >> really. isn't that bizarre? came from a charity event and he gets in one of the cars and the guy drives off with him -- >> he was the passenger in the car. >> passenger in the car and runs into a pole and blows up. >> yeah. the pictures of the scene afterward you can hardly make out it was a car. i never met him but he was a ver
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12